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A Look at the Rule Changes Currently Pending with the North Carolina Medical Board

The NC Rules Review Commission of the North Carolina Medical Board (NCMB) regularly considers and approves changes to the rules that govern the practice of medicine in North Carolina. You can follow the latest developments and review drafts of proposed and final rule changes through the NCMB’s Rule Change Tracker.

Here are some highlights from the NC Rules Review Commission’s most recent activity:

Effective July 1, 2017: Mandatory CME on Controlled Substance Prescriptions

Beginning July 1, 2017, all licensed practitioners and physician assistants who prescribe controlled substances will be required to complete annual continuing medical education (CME) on, “controlled substance prescribing practices, recognizing signs of the abuse or misuse of controlled substances, and controlled substance prescribing for chronic pain management.” Physicians must complete at least three hours of controlled substance CME (from the already-required 60 hours of Category 1 CME); and, for physician assistants, at least two of their mandatory 50 hours of CME must be devoted to the controlled substance-related topics listed above. The revisions affect Rules 21 NCAC 32R .0101 and 21 NCAC 32S .0216.

Physicians holding a residency training license are excluded from the new requirements.

Proposed: Mandatory CME on Controlled Substances Prescriptions for Nurse Practitioners

The NCMB has also proposed a change to Rule 21 NCAC 32M .0107 that would require nurse practitioners who prescribe controlled substances to complete at least one hour of continuing education annually that specifically addresses controlled substance prescription practices and abuse. As currently drafted, the rule change would become effective upon approval.

Proposed: Changes to Prescription Refill Rules for Controlled Substances

Also pending is a change to Rule 21 NCAC 32M .0109 that would change current practices concerning prescription refills. Under the current rule, refills can be issued for a period of up to one year, with the exception that dosage units for controlled substances on Schedules II, IIN, III, IIIN, IV and V are limited to a 30-day supply. The proposed change eliminates both of these qualifications, and simply states that refills for all controlled substances are subject to the Controlled Substance Law and Regulation.

The NCMB’s Disciplinary Authority

It is critical that medical practitioners in North Carolina stay up-to-date on the NCMB’s rule changes. Failure to adhere to the revised rules, even if the failure represents an adherence to previous standards, can lead to professional discipline – up to and including license revocation. While a single, minor rule violation is unlikely to have such dire consequences, multiple violations can lead to enhanced discipline, and violations such as prescription errors resulting from a lack of CME can have severe professional implications as well.

Speak with a Raleigh Professional License Defense Attorney

If you are facing disciplinary action by the NCMB and would like to speak with an attorney about protecting your professional license, contact the Raleigh, NC law offices of Cheshire Parker Schneider & Bryan, PLLC. To schedule a confidential initial consultation with one of our professional license defense attorneys, call (919) 833-3114 or request an appointment online today.

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